PBWHA PROGRAMS

Prime Time Sister Circle 

PRIME TIME SISTER CIRCLE

 

Prime Time Sister Circle is an evidence-based, socially innovative intervention designed to improve the lifestyle of African American women between 40-75 in the areas of stress management, nutrition, fitness and prioritizing their own health.  It’s a facilitated, culturally relevant component support group for women – augmented with experts in the targeted areas.

Between 2011 and 2019, PBWHA (in partnership with more than eight churches, and several other organizations) has graduated more than 300 women from the Prime Time Sister Circle program.  Andrea Dongmo-Zebaze, Chizoba Onyekere, Liz Lazarus, and Mahlet Yared , students from the ”Social Determinants of Health” class of Dr. Andria Johnson at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted an oral survey of the experiences of Prime Time Sister Circle participants.  See the following document for the results of their work. 

Prime Time Sister Circle meets for two hours for 13 consecutive weeks in community based institutions and organizations. Preliminary clinical results in Philadelphia from September 2011 - June 2012 demonstrated a:

  • 20%  reduction in stress level of participants

  • 68% of the participants lost weight

  • more than 75% retention rate in participants

  • 17% decrease in hypertension from 40% at program start to 23% a program end

Andrea Dongmo-Zebaze, Chizoba Onyekere, Liz Lazarus, and Mahlet Yared , students from the ”Social Determinants of Health” class of Dr. Andria Johnson at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted an oral survey of the experiences of Prime Time Sister Circle participants.  See the following document for the results of their work. 

                  Prime Time Sister Circle Oral History (click here for PDF)  

PBWHA partners with schools and community-based organizations to conduct workshops. 
Please contact us if you have any questions or wish to host workshops at your site.

ADAPTATION AND EXPANSION


OPIOID PTSC:  PBWHA and Drs. Gaston and Porter believed that the PTSC program had the potential to have a positive impact on the lives of women dealing with emotional and physical health issues including opioid addiction.  The PTSC intervention could possibly provide a safe, supportive transitional space in which women could bridge the gap between being perceived- and often perceiving themselves- primarily in terms of their opioid/heroin addiction. PBWHA, Drs. Gaston and Porter, with support from the Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disabilities Services, collaborated with Stop and Surrender, Inc., a local residential recovery program to implement the first Opioid Prime Time Sister Circle.  Drs. Porter and Gaston conducted a focus group to take into consideration the stated needs and challenges of the participants. This first Circle provided preliminary results on the potential impact of the PTSC intervention on the physical and emotional health outcomes of midlife Black women who were in a substance abuse recovery program for opioid addiction. These results served the twofold purpose of providing evidence of the feasibility of conducting this type  of study on a larger scale and yielding insights on the potential impact of the PTSC intervention with this population. 

       Click links below:

                  Drs. Gaston & Porter Presentation on Opioid PTSC 

                  Opioid PTSC Preliminary Results

MILLENNIAL PTSC:  Given the success of the Prime Time Sister Circles, graduates of the Philadelphia PTSC program, and PBWHA interns expressed that a program similar to PTSC would be beneficial for younger women. The Philadelphia Black Women’s Health Alliance and Gaston & Porter Health Improvement Center have come together to adapt and expand this program to the needs of young women between the ages of 18 and 35.  This project offers an opportunity to develop and evaluate an intervention that prevents and/or reduces the onset of chronic diseases and improve infant and maternal mortality and morbidity outcomes.

 

A survey and two focus groups were conducted to capture the voices of women in the identified   age group and guide development of the project.  The finding of the survey and focus groups revealed that the most important issues to this group are: 1) emotional and mental health, 2) physical health 3) sexual health and relationships and substance abuse. The project was funded by the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disabilities Services. We would like to acknowledge involvement of Consultant, Kassandra McGlonn, MS – doctoral candidate and the following interns:

 

  • Kaira Brickhouse, MPH

  • Aissia Correll, MPH

  • Audretta Parker, BS

  • Lauren Satchell, MPH

  • Shanice Campbell, MPH

  • Zeeherah Eugene, BS

  • Alexandra Pierre, BS

  • Kenna Yadeta, MPH

       Click links below:

                The Millennial Project Poster

                 The Millennial PTSC Curriculum Analysis

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